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Should journalists put themselves in danger to cover natural disasters?

As Hurricane Sandy approached the U.S. East Coast, TV reporters headed outdoors for standups with rising storm surge and violent high winds as a backdrop. Abysmal conditions definitely make for good visuals, but are these standups necessary?

“The reason we’re on beaches and boardwalks is twofold: One is to convey the seriousness and two, because it hits the beach first,” NBC News’ David Verdi told the Washington Post. “That’s the reason we go into war zones and go to special events and places to where we can gain access to places that regular people cannot.”

But others say sending reporters out during dangerous weather undercuts the message that the public should stay off the streets. “Let's not pretend immersing themselves in wind or water, rather than broadcasting images of the scene sans people, has value beyond entertainment,” wrote Conor Friedersdorf in the Atlantic.

What do you think? Should TV journalists stand outside during severe weather to get a story? Have you ever put yourself in danger to cover a storm?

Photo of Hurricane Sandy CC-licensed on Flickr, courtesy of the EUMETSAT.

Reporting is Risk

I am a Reporter (Tv Journalist)In Peshawar and we often cover the stories in which we always take Risk but i think without risk its impossible to report from Khyber pukhtunkhwa and when you once decided that you want to be a journalist than you should take risk and in this situation you would receive life threats and will face so much difficulties and if some one don't like this then they want to leave this job.

mustafa kakar escape from afghanistan

THIS IS HERE WITH TO LET YOU KNOW THAT ME MUSTAFA KAKAR SON OF NEYAZ MOHAMMAD JOURNALIST FOR VOICE OF AMERICA (ASHNA AND KARWAN TVS) APPEALING FOR YOUR KIND ORGANIZATION FOR BEING PROTECTED. SINCE I HAVE BEEN LIFE THREATENED FOR MANY TIMES. I HAVE BEEN ONCE SHOOT BY SOME UNKNOWN ARMED MEN WHILE I WAS GOING TO KABUL AIRPORT TO HAVE A REPORT ON SMUGGLING. FORTUNATELY I HAVE SURVIVED. SECOND TIMES WHILE I WAS MAKING REPORTS FROM THE WOMEN ACTIVITY ON DEMOCRACY FROM LAGHMAN PROVINCE, I HAVE ONCE AGAIN BEEN THREATENED AND AFTER BRAOD CASTING THIS REPORTS I HAVE RECEIVED A LETTER IN WHICH THE TALIBAN WARNED ME OF BIENG KILLED. THAT IS WHY I HAVE BECOM OLIGED TO LEAVE OUT AFGHANISTAN. RIGHT NOW I AM IN PAKISTAN, BUT I DONT FEEL MY SELF EASY HERE TO. I REALLY FEAR NOT TO BE KIDNAPED OR KILL IN PAKISTAN AS WELL, BECAUSE I AM A TV JOURNALIST AND EVERY ONE KNOWS ME AND THE SITUATION HERE IN PAKISTAN IS NOT GOOD AS WELL.

WITH BEST REGARD

MUSTAFA KAKAR

VOICE OF AMERICA

JOURNALIST

Journalism can sometimes mean risking your life

The principle which says "the world would've not known had it not been for me" is what compels journalists to work even in terrific environments. Journalism can even mean meeting the most notorious rebel leader who can easily fish out his pistol and shot you, in search for the truth.

However, it's a matter of striking a wise code of decision between one's dear life and occupation when it comes to coverage of disasters such as storm. But I don'r think occupation is more important than one's life.

Its really risky as well for reporters

When cyclone sidr hit Southern Bangladesh I was lying at top floor of a five story building in capital Dhaka, some 400 kilometer away from the spot.

But I could not sleep since storm wind was hitting such a way that it want to uproot the building.

I was feeling very scared while thinking how people of that storm hit area spent the night.

When storm hits, it does not care who or which is infront of it. It won't spare you considering you as a journalist.

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